Karnamrita.das's blog

Disappearance Day of Shrila Prabhupada

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Tuesday the 13th of November is Shrila Prabhupada's disappearance day from this mortal world and his return to the Nitya-lila (Krishna's eternal pastimes). It is the 30th anniversary. Wow---that is over half my life!! How things have changed for me, in the lives of so many devotees present then, and in the Movement.

I was a young man of 27 years, and now I am 57. I became a devotee at 19 1/2, so really I had about 6 1/2 years of him being physically present. During those years most of us never considered that he could leave us at any time, though he did remind us of the possibility. Somehow we just expected him to always be present with us. If only I would have known!

Govardhana Puja Celebration Fun

Govardhana hill of prasadI was hoping to post something this morning, which here in America is Govardhana Puja day. It obviously didn't happen. Even though there are some articles on the front page about this day, I was inspired to share a few personal things with you about my day in preparation for this joyful and uplifting festival.

I had to sleep in a bit because I haven't taken my quota for the last few days, and it was wearing on me. As much as sleep is ignorance we still need it to stay healthy and in good spirits. I do push the envelop at times, but I always pay for it.

Celebrating a person's Life by celebrating their Death.

Chanting for a departed devoteeLast night practically all the residents of Prabhupada village came together to celebrate the life and passing of our friend and former community member, Nirguna Krishna Prabhu. We joined together at the straw bale house that he built for an evening of singing, shared remembrances, and incredible prasad (spiritual food).

What a contrast to some religious or cultural traditions where everyone is in black, the women veiled, speaking in hushed tones, somber, in the mood of mourning, where to laugh is like sacrilegious.

Death and dying

Nirguna  slowly dyingOur friend and Godbrother passed away (left his body) on Saturday in Sridhama Mayapur, India. He was a member of the community where I live for many years, building a house here, preaching, and helping out in so many ways. We are having a "celebration" in his honor tonight at 6:30 PM.

We could call it many things: a memorial service or something like that, yet it is really a celebration, especially since the way he left the world was so auspicious. He left during the holy month of Kartik, on an auspicious day, in the holy place of Lord Chaitanya's appearance (Mayapur) and surrounded by loving devotees chanting the holy name.

Raising Children as Devotional Service (Bhakti)

The subject for today's blog came out from a letter to the Editor of Back to Godhead in the current issue (Nov/Dec). The letter was by a Godbrother and friend of mine, which made a distinction given by Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakur, between "duties of the world" that are connected with Bhakti, and "direct" Bhakti which is generally thought of as the 9 processes of devotional service. (Actually from one perspective, "direct devotional service" is only in the Lila of Krishna and Mahaprabhu, but that is a side point.)

Positive and negative impetus for Bhakti

(this blog is recorded on the full page: quick time player needed)
In the Gita's 7th chapter Shri Krishna tells us that four kinds of pious people approach him to render service: the distressed, the desirer of wealth, the inquisitive, and he who is searching for knowledge of he Absolute. And once we have come to Krishna, Shrila Bhaktivinoda Thakur describes four levels or motivations for service: fear, prospect, duty, and love. One point in these two types of analysis is that there are many ways people come to Krishna, and different stages to aspire for once we do---the highest being serving out of love.

Subjective Reality in Relationships

There are different opinions regarding social issues or philosophy among devotees. Any perspective, side of an issue, or point of the Krishna conscious philosophy can be carried to an extreme in relation to others.

I tend to me on the middle of most issues, much to the chagrin of those who strongly advocate different perspective or causes. I do have strong opinions on certain issues, yet I am usually not on the front lines of confrontation. Ideally, even when I disagree I try to see the other perspective, and understand why the person holds the conviction they do.

Our life is in Krishna's hands

I wrote an early blog which was titled "Your life is in your hands: a story", so am I contradicting myself here? Not at all. I am just making the point that in our progressive Krishna consciousness, we have be able to entertain ideas that may appear contradictory, yet are actually complimentary.

The two ideas that our life is in our hands, and in Krishna's hands, go with the idea of yesterdays blog, that in order to be successful in any activity we require both our effort and Krishna's mercy.

We are all expendable

I wake the Deities 5 days a week in "the Village" as we sometimes call Prabhupada village . I have been doing this for a year and half. On occasion, like this morning, I don't make it for some reason. Usually (this makes 3 times I have missed my service) I forget to pull the plug for the alarm, and sleep in blissful ignorance that I have missed my service.

I like doing this service, yet it is an austerity. I have to be very conscious of getting to bed by 8:30 PM, so I can get enough sleep to properly function in the morning. I often say that "tomorrow begins tonight", because if you want to get up early, you have to go to bed early (or as devotees say, "take rest". My brother in-law used joke with me, "Take it where?)

More on Giving: Giving through chanting

A small idea or concept when practiced can truly change our life.

A human being is wired to run on habits. That is good and bad.

We have to reflect on our habitual ways of doing things, even or especially our spiritual practices or sadhana, and see if they are really serving us. Are we keeping the original intention in mind, or have our habits become dry rituals, ends in themselves?

We shouldn't be so busy that we don't make time on occasion to really evaluate our sadhana---chanting, attending Temple programs etc. Newcomers can take note of this as well.

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