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Yamuna Devi's Sweet Tomato Chutney with Fennel

fresh tommies:

Yamuna Devi's Sweet Tomato Chutney with Fennel

Yamuna Devi writes: "This dish, from a banquet at Calcutta’s famous Radha Govinda temple on Mahatma Gandhi Road, was served near the end of the meal. Depending on the number of courses, every regional cuisine of India has an order of serving, and sweet chutney – often served with plain rice or toasted pappadam – are considered palate cleansers after other spicy dishes.

Spiritual Voyage

The_Flying_Ship_by_AagaardDS:

"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes". (Marcel Proust)

"Premanjana-churita-bhakti-vilocanena - annoint your eyes with the ointment of bhakti". (Sri Brahma Samhita)

Big Brother is Watching (Over) You

Today (for my Australian readers, anyway) is the full-moon birthday of Lord Balarama, the eternally youthful brother of Lord Krishna. This evening I'm attending the Hare Krishna festivities here in Sydney.

In sacred Vedic theology, it is described how Lord Balarama is the first personal bodily expansion of Lord Krishna, the Supreme Personality of Godhead. All other incarnations expand from Him. In Lord Krishna's earthly pastimes, He plays as Krishna's older brother.

Yamuna Devi's Butternut Squash Puree with Coconut (Kaddu Bharta)

hello butternuts:

Yamuna Devi's Butternut Squash Puree with Coconut (Kaddu Bharta)

Yamuna Devi writes: "Pumpkin is the most popular winter squash in India. It is sold in cut pieces. This bright orange squash is more often boiled than baked. In the West, we can ash-or oven-bake whole smaller varieties, such as butternut, acorn, Hubbard or buttercup. Flavour and nutrition are locked within the tough, thick skin.

Yamuna Devi's Apple Salad (Seb Kachamber)

apples galore:

A simple but elegant recipe from my cookery guru, Yamuna Devi.

Yamuna Devi's Apple Salad (Seb Kachamber)

Outside of Kashmir, where most of India’s apples are grown, the texture of Indian apples tends to be mealy – a sure sign of over ripening due to long storage at warm temperatures. On the whole, I do not find them as good as most western varieties.

Yamuna’s Baked Bananas Stuffed with Tamarind-Flavoured Coconut

finger bananas:

My Godsister Yamuna Devi sadly passed away not too long ago. I would like to continue to occasionally offer her classic recipes online for your cookery pleasure.

Yamuna’s Baked Bananas Stuffed with Tamarind-Flavoured Coconut (Nariyal Bhara Kela)

Bananas are native to India and are one of the most popular fruits of the nation. There are said to be staggering 400 varieties of bananas.

Soft yet Strong

wearing down:

"Water is fluid, soft, and yielding. But water will wear away rock, which is rigid and cannot yield. As a rule, whatever is fluid, soft, and yielding will overcome whatever is rigid and hard. This is another paradox: what is soft is strong."
Lao-Tze 604 BC

The Singing Naan

Do you have days when you find yourself craving a certain type of food? I awoke wanting to eat hot ghee-slathered naan breads. This archival detour may lead me to buttery, crispy-edged heaven today...

Namita Gupta from Kuala Lumpur wrote:

"I have experience of making naan bread in a gas-tandoor. Now I am
trying to prepare it using microwave oven (with convection function). Please
can you give me the method how to make one."

My reply:

Well I never use microwave ovens, of all varieties.

My Winter Garden - Part Eight - New Broads in Town

Heads up! There's some new, beautiful young broads in town. I purchased organic broadbeans from Eden Seeds, my favourite supplier.

New Broads on the Block 1:

They took ages to poke their heads up. Two weeks in fact, but that is quite normal.

Pizza, But Not As We Know It

The other day I decided to whip up a batch of what I call Pizza Swirls. It's pizza, but not as we know it.

I had made a decent-sized batch of pizza dough (using 600g 'strong' pizza/bread flour). I had divided it into 6 balls and placed each ball in the freezer wrapped in a zip-lock bag.

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