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Blogs

  • Syndicated's picture
    Posted: 7 years 13 weeks ago
    Author: Kurma
    This is one of my most attractive garden beds, planted in a transportable planting bag. It's called Mesclun. The name comes from Provençal (Southern France) — mescla, "to mix"— and literally means "mixture". Mesclun is thus a salad mix of assorted small, young salad leaves. The traditional mix includes chervil, arugula, leafy lettuces and endive in equal proportions, but modern versions may include a mix of lettuces, spinach, arugula (rocket, or roquette), Swiss chard (silver beet),...
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    1,914 Reads
  • Karnamrita's picture
    Posted: 7 years 13 weeks ago
    Author: Karnamrita Das
    (this blog is recorded on the full page: quick time player needed) I have had a busy week, and haven't been able to complete the last part of the "True Independence..." series. However, during my busy week, I gradually put together the following poem, documenting some of my thoughts during construction of a deck. After the short poem I share some thoughts about my writing. I am still in awe of the writing process, and I come up with a few new intentions behind my blogs. Accomplishing even the...
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    2,778 Reads
  • Radha's picture
    Posted: 7 years 13 weeks ago
    0 Comment(s)
    1,885 Reads
  • Syndicated's picture
    Posted: 7 years 13 weeks ago
    Author: Kurma
    0 Comment(s)
    1,858 Reads
  • Syndicated's picture
    Posted: 7 years 13 weeks ago
    Author: Kurma
    A lone Snow Pea (Pisum sativum - variety 'Melting Mammoth') reaches for the clear Sydney winter sky. Apparently this variety originates from the Near East. One of the earliest of European vegetables, it was used originally as a dried pea, then by the Romans as green peas.
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    1,927 Reads