I humbly ask these questions. I understand that emotion often destroys logic, so please forgive me.

[View] People have told me that chanting "Hare Krishna" is good for helping clear the mind. It DOES WORK against road rage. I've tried it and I calm down pretty quickly.

My question is about changing behaviors. I have two friends with OCD. One takes meds and the other does not. BTW, both of them are very well behaved morally, let me say that. Their behaviors ARE NOT anything like sex or drinking. We are speaking of smaller, everyday behaviors. One is nosey and the other one gets mad at his aunt a lot. How can these people be so ingrained in their behaviors not to know enough that their behaviors are wrong? I'm not judging, I am just asking.

The first person, Julia, cannot communicate with me unless I conform to her ways and perspective. I have to approach her fully Christian. She cannot understand my tolerance of Muslims or how I know about history and because I was in a weak spot when she met me, she treats me like I am a child, even though I am more educated and more cultured than she. She dictates a lot. I cannot tell her that I am a Hare Krishna or she would say that I am going to hell. The second person appears not to be able to function in the world without being educated on life skills. So, educating people with mercy and love is out first calling?

So far, for me, the Gita has helped me to reform myself to a degree of about 70-75% in regards to self control. Some behaviors, though remain ingrained. I am more aware then they are, but sometimes, the Gita's influence stops and the mind keeps going. Like Arjun said, the mind is so wild that it is like taming the wind. Most of the negative behaviors on my part are controlled. I have listened to the Gita for a year now, but sometimes, the feelings remain and I give in to some of the smaller, petty behaviors which are foolish and stupid.

I recognize the ignorance but I still fall into it.

And, with people like myself and my friends, the world has divided itself into an "us" against "them" mentality. It is easy to understand my friends Julia and Chance, although it did take me a year to understand Julia a bit. Our minds are wired so differently. She is highly detailed and what I consider to be nosey, and she considers me to be too private and morose and I forget details. I'm the one who is "always morose" in the Gita-I'm kind of like that at times.

My empathic gift has grown since listening to the Gita, but because of the "us" against "them" perspective of the world and fearing getting hurt, I still see "otherness"-Understand that where I am, I have NO SUPPORT. NO SUPPORT FOR ISKON TYPE WORSHIP OF GOD.
___________________________

How do we deal with someone else's ignorance?

How do we change behaviors that are ingrained into our psyche? I suppose that this might be a life long work, but I am asking if there is a tougher program to follow that can really help with this. I am not western in terms of materialism, but I am western in terms of sometimes being overhwhelmed by emotion.

With the world being so hostile, how do we see everyone with equanimity?

How do we apply compassion for each individual and apply it to a wider spectrum of people while still protecting ourselves against the cruelties of others?

RE:

Thank you. I will study what you say to study. I know that some of this is karmic baggage.

Hare Krishna,

Ekatepnha

some notes

OCD is problem on the level of subtle body, some traumas from the past. Often cakras don't work properly and the person takes a lot of prana from the environment. It's called energy vampirism. One needs to protect oneself from this. Tilak works well.
Sometimes they understand their problems, often not.
Behaviors grow from actions, actions from thoughts, thoughts from desires influenced by gunas.

Julia seems to be a mechanic type of kanistha devotee. These people often grew up in a strict religious family where the focus is on external symptoms of faith, not realization. Therefore everyone different is seen as bad but they can't explain why. Depending on their gunas, they're sentimental or fanatical.

> I recognize the ignorance but I still fall into it.

This is bhajana kriya. Falling and rising.

> Understand that where I am, I have NO SUPPORT. NO SUPPORT FOR ISKON TYPE WORSHIP OF GOD.

In such situations one needs to pray a lot for the Lord's inner support. That's the way people survived gulags etc. without getting crazy.

> How do we deal with someone else's ignorance?

By teaching by one's example. If the person refuses to learn, we should keep distance or move on, to avoid negative influences.

> How do we change behaviors that are ingrained into our psyche? I suppose that this might be a life long work, but I am asking if there is a tougher program to follow that can really help with this. I am not western in terms of materialism, but I am western in terms of sometimes being overhwhelmed by emotion.

By programing-in another patterns. In our case it's called sadhana.
If the behaviors are patological, they can be changed by various methods like regression, etc.
West doesn't have a monopoly on emotion, it's just shown in a different way.

> With the world being so hostile, how do we see everyone with equanimity?

Start with BG 2, jivatma tattva.

> How do we apply compassion for each individual and apply it to a wider spectrum of people while still protecting ourselves against the cruelties of others?

By understanding the relationship of jivatmas and Krsna and the nature of samsara, separation from Krsna.

Hari Hari
ys Jan

This is what I read

A few key terms must be understood in order to move forward. Dharma is the Hindu concept of 'duty.' In each life, we are reborn in accordance with our karma - which is simply the cumulative effect of our actions. Hinduism sees our life as a series of actions which have consequences - everything we do is part of a web of consequences which affects others, and thus every action has a 'reaction.' Our life is about living out the effects of these reactions, and we are reborn having to continually live out the debts that come with negative actions, until we end the cycle of birth and death by bearing out our karma. Dharma, then, or 'duty,' is simply that which we must do in each life in order to restore the rightful balance of karma.

http://www.gradesaver.com/bhagavad-gita/study-guide/section1/

quote

Dharma is not only a personal 'duty' but also the universal 'law' which defines karma for specific actions of specific person, time and place. That's not obvious from the quote. Dharma from the Vaisnava pov isn't meant to restore the balance of karma (as done on the karma kanda path) but to transcend it, to graduate from the school of karma ('hard knocks'). See also

http://www.veda.harekrsna.cz/encyclopedia/dharma.htm

Hari Hari
ys Jan