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SB 1.7 - The Bhāgavatam begins with a story of Mahabharata

Any historical fact which has connection with the activities of the Lord is transcendental. In Bhāgavatam, the activities of Kṛṣṇa are central and not just supplementary historical facts as in other scriptures. One should not foolishly conclude that only the tenth canto is related to Kṛṣṇa. All cantos are as important as the tenth canto. Kṛṣṇa and His pure devotees like the Pāṇḍavas are on the same plane. Kṛṣṇa is not without His devotees of all the rasas, and the pure devotees are not without Kṛṣṇa. Therefore talks about the devotees are all kṛṣṇa-kathā. Thus Sūta said he would begin his narration of Lord Śrī Kṛṣṇa, and also topics of the birth, activities and deliverance of King Parīkṣit, as well as topics of the renunciation of the sons of Pāṇḍu. How Parīkṣit heard the Bhāgavatam while fasting till death and other topics will be explained. For the first time, we will see Kṛṣṇa in action. Kṛṣṇa makes His appearance by serving His devotee, Arjuna, as His chariot driver.

A story is now told to show how Parīkṣit even in the womb was able to see Kṛṣṇa. When the warriors of both Kauravas and Pāṇḍavas were killed on the battlefield of Kurukṣetra and attained their deserved destinations, and when Duryodhana’s spine was broken by Bhīma, Aśvatthāmā beheaded the five sleeping sons of Draupadī and delivered them as a prize to his master, thinking that he would be pleased. Duryodhana, however, disapproved of the heinous act, and was not pleased in the least. He understood that the Kuru dynasty had been destroyed by the death of the children but felt sorrow that his enemies such as Bhīma were still alive. Thus Duryodhana died with both joy and sorrow.