Smart Quote of the Day, May 23, 2019

Complexity: 
Easy

"Living like an animal, not understanding the goal of life, one foolishly thinks that there is no eternity and that his life span of fifty, sixty, or, at the most, one hundred years, is everything. This is the greatest foolishness. Time is eternal, and in the material world one passes through different phases of his eternal life."

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Srimad-Bhagavatam 6.5.19

[Of the innumerable collections of spiritual teachings found in Vedic literature, Srimad-Bhagavatam is considered the topmost. Vedic literature is sometimes said to be a “desire tree,” a tree that can yield whatever one might desire, and of that tree the Srimad-Bhagavatam is said to be the ripe and most relishable fruit.

This chapter of Srimad-Bhagavatam describes events occurring just after the formation of the universe, when Daksha, one of the universal progenitors, had instructed his many sons to mentally prepare themselves for family life (and subsequently increasing the population). In this verse, Daksha's sons are expressing their realizations after hearing from the sage Narada about the fleeting, insubstantial nature of all things in this material world.]

TRANSLATION

[Narada Muni had spoken of a physical object made of sharp blades and thunderbolts. The Haryasvas understood this allegory as follows.] Eternal time moves very sharply, as if made of razors and thunderbolts. Uninterrupted and fully independent, it drives the activities of the entire world. If one does not try to study the eternal element of time, what benefit can he derive from performing temporary material activities?

PURPORT:

This verse explains the words ksaura-pavyam svayam bhrami, which especially refer to the orbit of eternal time. It is said that time and tide wait for no man. According to the moral instructions of the great politician Chanakya Pandita:


ayusah ksana eko ’pi
 na labhyah svarna-kotibhih
na cen nirarthakam nitih
 ka ca hanis tato ’dhika

Even a moment of one’s lifetime could not be returned in exchange for millions of dollars. Therefore one should consider how much loss one suffers if he wastes even a moment of his life for nothing.

Living like an animal, not understanding the goal of life, one foolishly thinks that there is no eternity and that his life span of fifty, sixty, or, at the most, one hundred years, is everything. This is the greatest foolishness. Time is eternal, and in the material world one passes through different phases of his eternal life.

Time is compared herein to a sharp razor. A razor is meant to shave the hair from one’s face, but if not carefully handled, the razor will cause disaster. One is advised not to create a disaster by misusing his lifetime. One should be extremely careful to utilize the span of his life for spiritual realization, or Krishna consciousness.

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